IPHS Book Prizes

The International Planning History Society (IPHS) endeavours to foster the study of planning history worldwide. It seeks to advance scholarship in the fields of urbanism, history, planning and the environment, focusing particularly on cities from the late nineteenth century.

At the 2018 IPHS conference in Yokohama (Japan), up to three book prizes will be awarded:

The first prize is for the most innovative book in planning history written in English and based on original new research. Books must have been published in the previous two calendar years (2016-2017). Books may be written individually or joint-authored.

The second prize is for the best book (in English) related to planning history of the country/region where the IPHS-2018 conference is held, in this case defined as East Asia, and published in the previous two calendar years (2016-2017). Books may be written individually or joint-authored.

The third prize is for the best planning history edited work or anthology (in English) and again published in the previous two calendar years (2016-2017). Reprints and “readers” are ineligible. The prize will go to the editor(s).

The prize for each award is $250US. The prizes will be announced and awarded at the 18th IPHS conference in Yokohama in July 2018. Winners will be informed as early as practicable in 2018 to facilitate participation at the conference.

Nominations are invited from scholars and publishers. Nominations will comprise a 400 word statement, a short CV of the author(s)/editor(s) (these materials should also be sent electronically), and 5 copies of the nominated book (non-returnable). The deadline for receipt of submissions for the next prize is 15 December 2017.

IPHS Book Prizes Committee members are:
Dr. Heleni Porfyriou, National Research Council of Italy-ICVBC, Italy (Chair);
Prof. Filippo De Pieri, Politecnico di Torino, Italy;
Prof. Mia Fuller, University of California, Berkeley;
Prof. Cristina Leme, Universidade de São Paulo, Brazil;
Prof. André Sorensen, University of Toronto Scarborough, Canada.
 

Nomination packages should be sent to the following addresses:
Heleni Porfyriou,
CNR-ICVBC
Area della Ricerca di Roma 1
Via Salaria km 29,300 C.P. 10
00015 Monterotondo Scalo – Roma-Italy
tel: 0039-06-90672202;
heleni.porfyriou@cnr.it 

Mia Fuller
Associate Professor and Head Graduate Advisor,
Department of Italian Studies
6303 Dwinelle Hall
University of California
Berkeley, CA 94720-2620
USA
(Tel + 1 510 642 2704)

Cristina Leme
(School of Architecture and Urbanism University of São Paulo, Brasil)
Rua Caraca 218 São Paulo, Brasil 05447-130

Filippo De Pieri
Associate Professor
Politecnico di Torino
Department of Architecture and Design
Viale Mattioli 39
10125 Torino
Italy

André Sorensen
(Chair, Department of Human Geography, University of Toronto Scarborough,
Ontario)
283 Wright Avenue
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
M6R 1L8

 

Awarded books

2018

First prize:

Sonne, Wolfgang (2017) Urbanity and Density in 20th-Century Urban Design. Berlin: DOM.

‘This book introduces’ as the author writes, ‘a new narrative to 20th-century urban design history: Instead of focusing again on the functionalist and avant-garde models of the dissolution of the city, it presents projects whose goal was the ideal of a dense and urbane city. This contradicts two historiographic commonplaces: firstly, that modern urban design generally intended to dissolve the city, and secondly, that the history of urban design in the 20th century is demarcated by two breaks – from the ‘traditional’ to the ‘modern’ and then to ‘postmodern’ city.’ Sonne’s book is extraordinary, beautifully produced and breathtaking in its scope. It outweighs all the other competitors. It is firmly situated in a recognizable European tradition of book writing, reminding of Werner Hegemann’s and Elbert Peets’ The American Vitruvius: An Architects’ Handbook of Civic Art, and is the outcome of a patient accumulation of examples of dense urban design in Europe and North America throughout the 20th century. Through its comparative and analytical approach Sonne’s book, as a mature piece of work having a deeply pondered familiarity with the conventional historiographies, introduces a new, innovative perspective in Western planning history, by bringing to the foreground a topic that is no doubt highly relevant for contemporary urban design practice, as well. In fact, as the author puts it ‘the book’s new evaluation of modern urban design history creates opportunities for current planning by offering best-practice examples which better reflect the striving for urbanity and density’. (Dr Heleni Porfyriou, Chair of the Book Prizes Committee)

 

Second prize:

Chang, Jiat-Hwee (2016) A Genealogy of Tropical Architecture: Colonial Networks, Nature and Technoscience, NY: Routledge.

This book is a solid piece of planning history focused on Singapore, challenging the normative definition of tropical architecture through a genealogical approach, heavily indebted to the writings of Michel Foucault. As the author argues, tropical architecture exists within a constantly changing field defined by colonial and postcolonial power relations. Drawing on the interdisciplinary scholarships on postcolonial studies, science studies, and environmental history, and situating its case studies, drawn out of Singapore, in the context of the largest British colonial networks, the author offers a new historical framework particularly important for contemporary planning concerned with climatic design and sustainability. (Dr Heleni Porfyriou, Chair of the Book Prizes Committee)

 

Third prize:

Haselsberger, Beatrix, ed. (2017) Encounters in Planning Thought. 16 Autobiographical Essays from Key Thinkers in Spatial Planning. New York and London: Routledge.

‘The book unpacks’, as the editor writes, ‘the secrets of how and why sixteen distinguished spatial planners with an average age of 75 built their ideas over the last five to six decades’. Considering that this was an extraordinary generation of thinkers, the book offers a major contribution to planning history and theory. Utterly fascinating, it makes for a compelling read, while it provides significant insights into each of these planners’ ideas, lives, and work. It will be a classic. It is already being used to teach graduate planning theory classes. The credit for this outcome goes in part also to the editor, who probably did an excellent subterranean work in ensuring the cohesion and the readability of the whole. (Dr Heleni Porfyriou, Chair of the Book Prizes Committee)

 

2016

First prize:

Gandy, Mathhew (2014) The Fabric of Space: Water, Modernity, and the Urban Imagination. MIT Press.

Second prize:

Cupers, Kenny (2014) The Social Project: Housing Postwar France. University of Minnesota Press.

Third prize:

Bloom, Nicholas Dagen; Umbach, Fritz and Vale, Lawrence J (eds) (2015) Public Housing Myths: Perception, Reality, and Social Policy. Cornell University Press.

 

2014

First prize:

Salewski, Christian (2013) Dutch New Worlds. Nai010, Rotterdam.

Second prize:

Basmajan, Carlton Wade (2013) Atlanta Unbound. Enabling Sprawl Through Policy and Planning. Temple University Press, Philadelphia.

Vale, Lawrence J. (2013) Purging the Poorest – Public Housing and the Design Politics of Twice-cleared Communities. The University of Chicago Press, Chicago and London.

 

2012

Special prize for an outstanding publication on planning history written in 2010-2012:

Freestone, Robert (2010) Urban Nation: Australia’s Planning Heritage. CSIRO Publishing, Collingwood (in association with the Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts, and the Australian Heritage Council).

 

2010

Best book on planning history written in 2009-2010:

Angotti, Tom (2008) New York for Sale: Community Planning Confronts Global Real Estate. The MIT Press, Cambridge.

Best book on Middle Eastern planning history written in 2009-2010:

Elshestawy, Yasser (2008) The Evolving Arab City: Tradition, Modernity and Urban Development. Routledge, London.

 

2008

Best book on planning history written in 2007-2008:

Bogart, Michele H. (2006) The Politics of Urban Beauty: New York and its Art Commission. The University of Chicago Press, Chicago and London.

Best book on Mediterranean planning history:

Fuller, Mia (2007) Moderns Abroad. Architecture, Cities and Italian Imperialism. Routledge, London and New York.

 

2006

Best book on planning history written in 2004-2005:

Broudehoux, Anne Marie (2004) The Making of Post-Mao Beijing. Routledge, London.

Best book on South Asian planning history written in 2004-2005:

Hosagar, Jyoti (2005) Indigenous Modernities: Negotiating Architecture and Urbanism. Routledge, London.

 

2004

Best book on planning history written in 2001-2003:

Sorensen, André (2002) The Making of Urban Japan: Cities and Planning from Edo to the Twenty First Century. Routledge, London.

Best book on Spanish and/or Latin American planning history written in 2001-2003:

Almandoz, Arturo (2002) Planning Latin American Capital Cities 1850-1950. Routledge, London.